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Asia-Pacific world’s most label-conscious

Asia Pacific consumers are the most likely to be won over by designer brand appeal.

Three in five Asia Pacific consumers (61 per cent) are willing to pay more for designer products, a higher percentage than in any other global region, according to a new online study from Nielsen.

The study revealed a staggering three in four (74 per cent) of Chinese consumers would spend more on designer goods, the highest globally, with India (59 per cent) and Vietnam (56 per cent) rounding out the world’s top three.

Asia Pacific consumers are also drawn to high profile brands, with more than half (55 per cent) saying they like to buy products of famous brands, compared to the global average of 47 per cent.

“The economic boom in a number of Asian countries coupled with growing middle class populations has seen the emergence of a new breed of consumers with higher disposable incomes,” said David Webb, MD, advertising solutions, Nielsen.

“Cashed up and ready to spend, these consumers are seeking out designer and well-known brands to project their new-found social status. The rapid expansion of the internet and other media channels has given rise to more exposure, awareness and desire for brands and products than ever before.”

The Nielsen report also brings to light the consequential role advertising has on influencing consumers’ purchasing decisions. Two thirds (67 per cent) of Asia Pacific consumers say advertising influences their preference for a brand – the highest in the world, and 12 points above the global average of 55 per cent.

This was especially pronounced in Korea and the Philippines, where four in five consumers (79 per cent and 78 per cent respectively) said commercials increased their brand preference, followed by Indonesia (74 per cent), India (74 per cent) and China (72 per cent).

In markets such as Australia, Japan and New Zealand, however, consumers took a more cynical view, with just one third saying advertising influenced their brand preference (32 per cent in Australia and New Zealand, and 34 per cent in Japan).

Close to two-thirds (64 per cent) of Asia Pacific consumers agreed the image created by advertising influenced their decision to buy a product, 10 points higher than the global average of 54 per cent, and more than half (51 per cent) said they would buy a product because they liked its commercial.

“Brands are presented with a huge opportunity to win over consumers in emerging Asian markets with clever and relevant advertising that establishes an emotional connection,” said Webb.

“Our research has found that ads work best if they entertain the consumer rather than focus on product features. Humour, relatable and iconic characters and an engaging storyline are common creative characteristics of high performing ads.”

Webb continued: “Targeted advertising certainly has a growing role to play when it comes to delivering brand messages, particularly in more developed markets where consumers are less-easily influenced to buy a product because of an ad.”

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